Paris on Film, Je T’aime

I was in Paris a couple of weeks ago, to hear about a new skincare launch by Chanel and to do some research for a forthcoming piece about the new biopic Coco Avant Chanel.

As we traced the great couturiere’s dainty footsteps across the quartier where she lived and worked, I was struck by just how many great films I’ve loved have been set and filmed there. And how, any time I need a fix of my favourite city, I have any number of wonderful movies available to me for an instant Parisian pick-me-up.

Filmmakers just love Paris. It’s little wonder, given the possibilities that it offers. Its spectacular scenery has lent itself to unforgettable musical numbers in everything from Vincente Minnelli’s Gigi (a whirlwind tour through the parks of Paris if ever there was one) to Woody Allen’s Everyone Says I Love You (who could forget Goldie Hawn dancing in the air on the banks of the Seine as she sings “I’m Through With Love”?).

Its buildings, squares and streets have added atmosphere and authenticity to historical epics and period dramas (think Dangerous Liaisons or A Very Long Engagement) and so much of the city is unspoiled that actual locations – the scene of the attempted assassination of General De Gaulle, at the corner of the rue de Rennes and the boulevard du Montparnasse, as featured in The Day of the Jackal, for example – can be used in their cinematic recreations.

You don’t need to be a director to be able to visualise clearly what the scene must have been like in the vast place de la Concorde when Madame La Guillotine was entertaining the crowds, or to imagine the misery of life in the Conciergerie prison where Marie-Antoinette and hundreds of others were held before they lost their heads: they have been preserved for posterity.

Similarly, legendary Parisian institutions – such as Maxim’s restaurant (as featured in the sumptuous Art Nouveau extravaganza Gigi as well as the tres chic sixties caper comedy How To Steal a Million), the Moulin Rouge, and the Chartier brasserie, where Jodie Foster lunched in A Very Long Engagement – have barely changed in decades, and so lend themselves beautifully to films set in any period since they opened. The Ritz will undoubtedly play its part in Coco Avant Chanel, as it was here that she enjoyed trysts with her lovers before nipping across the rue Cambon to her boutique.

The world-famous metro system and its iconic, labyrinthine stations have played host to nail-biting chases in such great (and very dissimilar) movies as Diva and Charade, and the Eiffel Tower has played a pivotal part in everything from Ealing comedy (The Lavender Hill Mob) to James Bond thriller (A View to a Kill). A moonlit Bateau Mouche cruise on the Seine is where Cary Grant and a Givenchy-clad Audrey Hepburn fall in love in one of the most evocative of all Paris films, the super-sexy comedy-thriller Charade.

The many facets of the city’s personality are reflected in the range of films that have been set there. The threatening side of Paris – especially to hapless American tourists – was exploited to great effect in the Roman Polanski thriller Frantic, in which Harrison Ford’s wife disappears without a trace from their hotel bedroom.

The often deserted platforms and empty corridors of the metro evoke the eery, unsettling side of a city with its fair share of nutters. Just ask Steve Buscemi who, in the recent portmanteau movie Paris Je T’aime, has an unpleasant (and not entirely unusual) experience while waiting for a train in the Tuileries station. Equally, the sordid and tacky parts of Paris have been shown in a diverse range of films including Amelie, which views the sex shops around the Faubourg St-Denis with characteristic bemusement.

Few films have evoked the quixotic, magical side of Paris as well as Amelie, which portrayed the city as a big adventure playground for romantics and underlined the fact that it’s the sum of its many parts, of which the pretty, whimsical, self-contained Montmartre area is just one.

Meanwhile, such Parisian passions as American jazz have produced some superior jazz movies, including Paris Blues and Round Midnight. And the city’s status as the capital of style has inspired a string of fashion films, among them Pret-a-Porter, Robert Altman’s chronicle of the catwalk shows, and the gloriously chic Funny Face.

Indeed, Funny Face is probably the greatest of all the cinematic billet doux from Hollywood to Paris. A gorgeous, colourful, joie-de-vivre-exuding movie, it highlights how one person’s Paris can be entirely different from another’s – because of all these separate, but overlapping, facets to the city’s character. While Fred Astaire’s urbane photographer character is drawn to the grandeur of the Champs-Elysees, the fashion editor played by Kay Thompson wants to hit the shops around the rue St-Honore, and our bookish, beatnik heroine, Audrey Hepburn, can’t wait “to philosophise with all the guys in Montmartre – and Montparnasse”, and explore cafe culture. .

Paris Je T’aime cleverly used this all-things-to-all-people idea to highly original effect, by gathering together 18 different stories, each set in a different part of the city. It’s the ultimate Paris film locations-wise, but, of course, the love affair between Paris and the movies isn’t dependent on complete authenticity. The most famous romantic movie of all time, Casablanca, was partly set in Paris and although filmed entirely in California, it captured the city’s romantic personality by suggesting that Paris was more than a place; it is a state of mind.

After all, as Bogey says to Ingrid Bergman as they separate forever: “We’ll always have Paris.”

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8 Comments

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8 responses to “Paris on Film, Je T’aime

  1. Where is the location in Pairs…. of the mansion that is the site of Audrey Hepburn’s character Nicole in How To Steal A Million….
    Thanks,
    Gene

    • alisonkerr

      Hi Gene, I’m afraid I don’t have the address for the beautiful house that Audrey Hepburn lives in in How To Steal a Million – but it looks to me like it could be in the 8th or 16th arrondissements. When she gets her taxi home from the Ritz,Peter O’Toole gives the driver the address “38 rue Parmentier”. There’s an avenue Parmentier but it’s in the 11th, which doesn’t seem as likely a location. I haven’t actually checked this address out in Paris but I think it’s a red herring. If I find out where the house is – and this could be my mission next time I’m in Paris – I’ll update the article.. Thanks for your interest. Best wishes, Alison

  2. nancy

    to gene and alisonkerr….thanks, I too would like to know where this mansion is. I checked out googlemaps and 38 Rue Parmentier does not appear to be the actual place.

  3. nancy

    if i copied it correctly, this website shows pictures of the address in question…it is definitely not the gorgeous mansion.

    http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=http://www.meilleursagents.com/prix-immobilier/m2/avenue-parmentier-232/38/&ei=ue-sTaXcGKWx0QG6g7WiCw&sa=X&oi=translate&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CDsQ7gEwBA&prev=/search%3Fq%3D38%2Brue%2Bparmentier%2Bparis%26hl%3Den%26prmd%3Divnsom

    Photos du 38 avenue Parmentier, 75011 Paris 11e Photos of 38 avenue Parmentier, 75011 Paris 11e

  4. audreyfan

    How to Steal a Million was released in 1966. I found a real estate site listing the apartment building at 38 rue Parmentier as having been built in 1860, so the home used for the exteriors was not at that address location. If I lived in a mansion like that I would not want my address given out in a movie. Every tourist who is curious about that movie would be coming to my home. So the home must exist somewhere else — if it still exists. Which is the wealthiest arrondisement in Paris? That’s probably where it is located.

  5. Turboff

    You have the correct address. Sadly, the house was demolished, replaced by that ugly apartment block.

    • Thank you Nancy…..
      too bad! it was such a beautiful mansion…maison!!!
      What and where was the Coco building located…
      Just made my ’13 Paris arrangements..I so miss it…any time of the year…

      Best regards,

      Gene

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